Commands for Reading the Screen

This section includes commands for Reading the screen and also Text elements:

Keyboard Help:
INSERT+1. This is a toggle key. The first time you press it, it turns on keyboard help. Press it a second time to turn off keyboard help. When keyboard help is turned on, you can press any key to hear what it will do without actually doing anything. It is great for typing practice. Also, if you press a JAWS command key such as Insert+Up Arrow to read the current line, it tells you what the keystroke will do without actually doing it.

Say Window Title:
Insert+T. Pressing Numpad Insert with the letter T reads the title of the document or web page that you are on, and then tells you which application you are in. For this reason, many people call it the Where Am I command.

Say Character:
Numpad 5. Speaks the character under the cursor. If you tap Numpad5 twice quickly, it speaks the military alphabet character. This is handy if you didn’t understand the character; for example, whether JAWS said B or D. Pressing numpad5 twice will say Bravo or Delta which makes it clear.

Say Prior Character:
Left Arrow. You can use the standard left arrow key, or the left arrow key on the number pad which is 4 when the NumLock key is turned off. The NumLock key is the top left key on the number pad.

Say Next Character:
Right Arrow. You can use the standard right arrow key, or the right arrow key on the number pad which is 6 when the NumLock key is turned off. The NumLock key is the top left key on the number pad.

Say Word:
Insert+Numpad 5. This keystroke speaks the word where the cursor is located.

Spell Word:
Insert+Numpad 5 pressed twice quickly. This keystroke spells the word where the cursor is located.

Say Prior Word:
Insert+Left Arrow. Moves left one word and speaks it. Use NumPad insert with the 4 on the number pad. The 0/Insert key located at the bottom left of the number pad is sometimes called the JAWS key, because it is used with many of the JAWS screen reading commands. Use of the JAWS key allows most of the JAWS screen reading commands to be executed with one hand. Thus, Insert+Left Arrow moves left one word, and speaks it. You can reach over with your right hand and press Insert+Left Arrow, (Numpad Insert with the 4 key on the number pad), to move left one word at a time. This can be done without moving your left hand away from the standard typing position. The JAWS screen reader commands thus allow you to read important text on the screen more rapidly.

Say Next Word:
Insert+Right Arrow. Moves right one word and speak it. It can be used to move through a document one word at a time.

Say Current Line:
Insert+Up Arrow. This command speaks the line that you are on. It is used in Microsoft Word, in Windows and on the Internet. It reads the line that has focus.

Say Prior Line:
Up Arrow. Moves up one line and speaks it. You can use either the standard Up Arrow key, or the Numpad Up Arrow which is the 8 key on the number pad.

Say Next Line:
Down Arrow. Moves down one line and speaks it.

Say Sentence:
Alt+Numpad 5. Reads the current sentence. This is very helpful when you are trying to determine whether your sentence is correct grammatically.

Say Prior Sentence:
Alt+Up Arrow. Moves to the prior sentence and reads it.

Say Next Sentence:
Alt+Down Arrow. Moves to the next sentence and reads it. Each time that you press Alt+Down Arrow, your cursor will be moved to the beginning of the next sentence, and that sentence will be read. This is handy when you are proofreading a document.

Say Paragraph:
Control+Numpad 5. Reads the current paragraph.

Say Prior Paragraph:
Control+Up Arrow. Moves to the beginning of the previous paragraph and reads it. It is generally used to move backward through a document one paragraph at a time.

Say Next Paragraph:
Control+Down Arrow. Moves to the next paragraph and reads it. This keystroke interrupts speech and then moves to the next paragraph and reads it. For this reason, the Control+Down Arrow command is used to quickly skim through a document. This mimics the manner in which a person with vision would quickly skim through a document to find an important point or section.

Say from beginning of line to Cursor:
Insert+Home. Reads from the beginning of the line to your cursor position. To execute this command with one hand, use the Home key on the number pad which is Numpad 7. Application. Suppose that you are typing something and are interrupted by a phone call. The Insert+Home command you can quickly determine where you left off.

Say from Cursor to end of line:
Insert+Page Up. Reads the text from the cursor position to the end of the current line. For this command, use Page Up key on the number pad which is Numpad 9. This keystroke will alert you if there is text to the right of your working cursor. This can keep you from inadvertently inserting text in front of text that is on the line where you are working.

Say All:
Insert+Down Arrow. Reads through a document without stopping. Reading will continue until you reach the bottom of the document, or until you tap the Control key to stop reading. Use the JAWS key with the Down Arrow on the number pad. On the Number pad, Down Arrow is the 2 key. Insert+Down Arrow is used to quickly read both documents and web pages.

Changing Speech Rate, Quickly Rewind and Fast Forward, and Cursor Commands

The following commands allow you to control the JAWS speech rate on the fly. You can also use JAWS to rewind and fast forward, and follow different cursors.

Keyboard Help:
Insert+1. This is a toggle key. The first time that you press it, keyboard help is turned on. You can press any key to hear what it is. Or, you can try any JAWS command to practice it without actually doing it. When you are done, press Insert+1 a second time to turn keyboard help off.

Increase Voice Rate during say all:
Page Up. This command quickly increases speech rate while you are reading. Application. This command can be used as follows. Press Insert+Down Arrow, (the Say All command), to read continuously through your document. If, while reading, you decide that JAWS is talking too slow, press the Page Up key to increase speech rate on the fly. You can use the Page Up on the Number Pad, or you can use the Page Up key on the 6-pack, (the group of six keys located directly above the standard arrow keys).

Decrease Voice Rate during say all:
Page Down. This command decreases speech rate while JAWS is reading continuously. Application. Press Insert+Down Arrow to start continuous reading. If you decide that JAWS is reading too fast, press the Page Down key to quickly reduce the reading rate. If you use the previous command, (Page Up), to increase speech rate and decide that JAWS is speaking too rapidly, just press Page Down to reduce speech rate.

Increase Voice Rate when not in say all:
Alt+Control+Page Up. This command quickly increases speech rate when you are not reading continuously. When you are in an application and just want to increase speech rate temporarily, use Control+Alt+Page Up to quickly increase speech rate. This is a temporary rate increase. When you change to another application, the speech rate will return to the default rate that has been set for JAWS.

Decrease Voice Rate when not in say all:
Alt+Control+Page Down. This command is used to quickly decrease the speech rate when you are not reading continuously. This is a temporary change. When you switch to another application, the speech rate will return to the default rate that has been set for JAWS.

Restore Normal Voice Settings:
Insert+Escape. This keystroke both refreshes the screen, and also returns the JAWS speech rate to the default rate that has been set for the JAWS program. Application. Suppose that you press Alt+Control+Page Up several times so that JAWS is talking so fast that you cannot understand it. Just press Insert+Escape to return to the default speech rate.

Skip to the next unit when in say all:
Press Right Arrow. If you are reading continuously, this keystroke skips you to the next line, sentence, or paragraph depending on how the Say All reading unit is set. The default setting for JAWS is to read all lines without pauses when in Say All or continuous reading mode. Thus, if you tap the Right Arrow while reading continuously, JAWS will skip to the next line and continue reading. Continue pressing Right Arrow while reading continuously to quickly skim through the document. To change the reading unit, press Insert+F2 and then arrow down to Jaws Options and press Enter. Navigate down through the tree view until you get to Say All options. Here, arrow down to the "Say All Reads By --," option and use the Spacebar to cycle through the available options. When you get to the option that you want, press Enter to accept it. See the What's New in JAWS section of this document for instructions in navigating the tree view in the JAWS Options center.

Skip to the prior unit when in say all:
Press Left Arrow. This keystroke lets you hear the last line or paragraph spoken without requiring you to stop continuous reading.

Interrupt Speech:
Press Control. If you are in continuous reading mode, just tap the Control key to stop reading.

PC Cursor:
Numpad Plus. This returns you to use of the PC cursor, which is the default reading cursor for JAWS. When you are working in a program like Microsoft Word, the PC cursor is sometimes referred to as the writing cursor, because it highlights the point where your are writing.

JAWS Cursor:
Numpad Minus. Pressing Numpad Minus, (the key at the top right of the number pad), turns on the JAWS cursor. This cursor has a lower pitch, and it actually moves the mouse around on the screen. For this reason, many people call it the Mouse cursor. It lets you read things on the screen without moving your working cursor which is the PC cursor. It also lets you read portions of the screen that you cannot get to with the standard PC cursor. For example, it lets you read items that are on the Menu bar or toolbars. It is often used when you are on the Internet to locate and read a description of a link or button that is not spoken by the virtual PC cursor that is used when you are browsing the Internet.

Route JAWS to Pc Cursor:
Insert+Numpad Minus. This turns on the Mouse cursor, and actually moves it to the location of your PC cursor or, when you are on the Internet, to the position of the virtual PC cursor that is used when browsing the Internet with JAWS.

Route Pc to JAWS Cursor:
Insert+Numpad Plus. This moves your PC cursor to the position of something that you found when browsing with the JAWS cursor if that is possible. Application 1. Suppose that you are in Microsoft Word, and that you use Insert+Numpad Minus to route your JAWS or mouse cursor to the point where you are working. You can use standard movement commands, (Up Arrow, Down Arrow, Control+Right Arrow, or Control+Left Arrow), to move around the screen with the JAWS or mouse cursor. If you find an error that you want to correct, press Insert with Numpad Plus to route the JAWS PC cursor to this location. You can now correct the error. However, if you have moved your JAWS cursor to a menu item or to the ribbon bar in Microsoft Word, the Insert+Numpad Plus command cannot move the PC cursor to this location, since you cannot edit a menu or ribbon bar.
Application2, Internet. Suppose that you are on the Internet, and you cannot navigate to a certain button using the virtual PC cursor. Press Insert+Numpad Minus to route the JAWS cursor to your current location. Use standard movement commands, (Up Arrow, Down Arrow, Control+Right Arrow, or Control+Left Arrow), to move around the screen and hunt for the button. When you find it, you can press Insert+Numpad Plus to move the virtual PC cursor to this button.

JAWS Help Commands

Keyboard help:
Insert+1. Turns on JAWS keyboard Help so that you can try commands or press keys to see what they are. This is a toggle, so pressing Insert+1 again will turn JAWS keyboard Help off.

Say Current Hot Key:
Press Shift+Numpad 5 when in a menu. Usually, simply pressing Numpad 5 will work. This speaks the hot key that will open a menu or dialog. Application. Press Alt+F to open the File menu in Microsoft Word and arrow down to the Save As dialog. Press Numpad5; JAWS will say the letter A. This tells you that, any time you are in a Microsoft Word document, you can press Alt+F followed by the letter A to quickly open the Save As dialog.

Say Default button when in a dialog:
Press Insert+E when in a dialog. For example, if you have made changes to a Word document and press Control+F4 to close the document, or Alt+F4 to close the program, JAWS will ask you if you want to save the changes. To hear the default button, press Insert+E. JAWS will say Yes. Then you know that, if you press Enter, you will save the changes that were made to the document. Insert+E can be used to determine the default button for many Windows dialogs.

Open Combo Box:
Alt+Down Arrow. This is most often used to open a combo box on the Internet. For example, suppose that you are filling out a form on the Internet and come to a combo box that is used to select your state. Pressing Alt+Down arrow will open the combo box. You can then arrow down to California and then press Alt+Up Arrow to close the combo box. This will insure that California has been selected.

Close Combo Box:
Alt+Up Arrow. This closes a combo box and selects the item that you have selected using the arrow keys.

Screen Sensitive Help:
Insert+F1. Brings up a description of the document or application along with a short list of shortcuts that are available. You can review the description using your arrow keys. When done reviewing the description, press the Escape key to return to the point where you were working.

Read Word in Context:
Insert+C. This is used most often with the Spell checker in Microsoft Word or Outlook. For example, press F7 to start the spell checker. If the program finds a misspelled word, the word will be spoken, followed by a suggested spelling. To hear the context, press Insert+C. JAWS will read the sentence in which the misspelled word was located.

JAWS Help for Applications:
Press Insert+f1 twice quickly; press Alt+F4 to close. If you are in an application like Microsoft Word, pressing Insert+F1 twice quickly will open the JAWS Applications Help program. JAWS will say “Topic Word”. Press the F6 key to get to a document pane that is actually like a web page. You can then press the H key to move through headings. Or press Insert+Down Arrow, (the Say All command), to read all of the JAWS information available for the Microsoft Word application. Pressing F6 returns you to the tree view where you can use your arrow keys to select another application for which there is JAWS help. When done, press Alt+F4 to close the help program and return to the application in which you were working.

Hotkey help:
Insert+H., (press Escape to close virtual viewer). This gives a quick overview of JAWS hot keys that are available for the application in which you are working. You can use your arrow keys or the Say All command, (Insert+Down Arrow), to read about the JAWS keystrokes that are available. Press the Escape key to close the description window and return to the application in which you were working.

Window Keys Help:
Insert plus W, (press Escape to close virtual viewer). Gives application shortcut keys for the program that you are running. For example, press Insert+W while in Microsoft Word. A window will come up that contains a list of all of the Microsoft Word shortcut keys. When you are done reading about the shortcut keys available for working in Microsoft Word, just press the Escape key to return to the document in which you were working.

JAWS window:
Insert + J. Opens a Context menu with JAWS setup options if this feature is enabled in JAWS. Otherwise, it brings focus to the JAWS program window. Thus, if JAWS is set to appear in the system tray, pressing Insert+J opens a context menu where you can change JAWS settings. Just press Escape to close this list. If JAWS is not in the System Tray, pressing Insert+J opens the JAWS Window where you can use the menus to change options. If you are in the JAWS Window, you can press Windows+M to minimize the JAWS Window.

Refresh screen or restore normal voice settings:
Insert plus escape. This command returns the speech rate to its default setting if you have changed it. It also refreshes the screen.

Adjust JAWS Options:
Insert plus v. Allows you to change JAWS settings for an application. Select the setting that you want to change, and then press the Spacebar to change the setting. When done, press Enter to activate the OK button and close the JAWS verbosity window. See the What's New section of this document for more information about navigating the JAWS Options tree view.

Internet Commands

Move to the next or previous link:
Press the Tab key to move to the next link. Pressing Shift+Tab will move you to the previous link. When you get to the link that you want, press Enter to activate it.

List the links on a Page:
Press Insert+F7. Once in the list, use your up or down arrow keys to move through the links. If you know the link that you are looking for, you can press the first letter of the link to move to it quickly; then press Enter to activate it. Or, when you are in the list of links, you can press Tab one time followed by Enter to move to the link without activating it. When you are in the links list, pressing Home will move you to the first link on the page. Pressing End will move you to the last link on the page.

List the headings on a Page:
Press Insert+F6. All of the headings will be placed in a vertical list. Use your arrow keys to select a heading. You can then press Enter on any heading in the list to move quickly to that heading. If the heading is also a link, (as is the case with stories in the Los Angeles Times), pressing Enter will take you directly to the page with the story. When you are in the headings list, pressing Home will move you to the first heading on the page. Pressing End will move you to the last heading on the page.

List all of the Form fields on a Page:
Press Insert+F5 to list all of the form Controls. Once in the list, you can press Home to go to the first control on the page, or you can press end to move to the last control.

Move to the next or previous Heading:
Press the letter H to move to the next heading. Pressing Shift+H will take you to the previous heading.

Move to the next or previous Form Field:
Press the letter F to move to the next form field. Pressing Shift+F will move you to the previous form field.

Move to the Next or Previous Table:
Press the letter T to move to the next table. Pressing Shift+T will move you to the previous table. Once in a table, you can hold down the Alt and Control keys and then navigate around the table as follows:
Move right one cell: Control+Alt+Right Arrow.
Move Left one cell: Control+Alt+Left Arrow.
Move down one row: Control+Alt+Down Arrow.
Move Up one Row: Control+Alt+Up Arrow.
Move Down One Row and read across the columns: Press Windows+Alt+Down Arrow.

Add Custom label to a link or graphic:
Control+Insert+Tab. Allows you to add a custom label to a window or control on the internet. For example, you can add a label to a link or form field that is not being spoken.

Create temporary PlaceMarker on web page:
Press Control+Windows+K. When you return to the page, press Control+Shift+K and then Spacebar to select it. Press Enter to quickly move to your place marker. You can have one temporary PlaceMarker per page. To remove the PlaceMarker, press Control+Shift+K, select the Placemark; then Tab to the Remove button and press Enter.

To learn use of Internet with JAWS, open Internet Explorer and press Control+O. Type www.freedomscientific.com and press Enter. Press Insert+F7 for a links list and press the letter T followed by Enter to go to the Training page. Again, list the links and press the letter S followed by Enter to open the Surf's Up Internet training page.

List PlaceMarkers on current web page:
Press Control+Shift+K. To add a PlaceMarker, press the Tab key to get to the Add button; then press Spacebar and type a name for your Placemarker; then press Enter. Pressing Control+Shift+K will now include the Placemarker in the list for that page.

Miscellaneous JAWS Commands that Assist in Use of Windows.

Open JAWS Manager Dialog:
Insert+F2. This brings up a list of the managers available for JAWS. For example, there is a dictionary manager that can be used to change the way that JAWS pronounces a word. This is often used to change the way in which JAWS pronounces a proper name. There are 17 managers available. See the JAWS training materials for detailed information about how these managers work. The managers available are as follows:
Adjust Braille Options. Allows you to select a Braille display and change the way in which Braille is shown on a Braille display.
Adjust JAWS Options. Allows you to quickly customize how Jaws works when you are in an application.
Custom Highlight Assign.
Customize List View. Here, you can adjust items that will be shown when you are in a list view.
Dictionary Manager. Lets you change how JAWS pronounces words. Very good for correcting the way in which a proper name is pronounced.
Frame Viewer.
Graphics Labeler. Used for labeling graphics so you know what they are.
Keyboard Manager.
Mark colors in Braille.
Navigation Quick Keys. Quick Keys allow you to navigate quickly in Microsoft Word. See section on Quick Keys.
Prompt Create.
ResearchIt. Used to quickly obtain information from the Internet, (see below).
Script Manager. Used by programmers to enable JAWS to work with programs. This allows JAWS to be customized so that it can work in job settings where customized programs are used.
Settings Center. Allows the user to control all JAWS settings for all applications, or for individual applications. When you run this manager, a search box comes up that helps to quickly locate the setting that you want. See the JAWS Training materials for more information.
Settings Packager. Allows you to save your settings so that they can be imported into a new version of the program, or used on another machine.
Skim Reading Tool.
Windows Class Reassign. Used by programmers; be careful with this one.

Shut Down JAWS:
Insert+F4 followed by Enter. This allows you to unload JAWS so that a person with vision or a person who uses screen magnification can use the computer. When you press Insert+F4, you will be advised that pressing Enter will unload JAWS. Press Enter to unload JAWS, or press the Escape key to cancel the process if you do not wish to unload the program. It is a good idea to assign a keystroke like Alt+Control+J to the JAWS icon on your desktop. That way, if a person without vision unloads JAWS, they can press Alt+Control+J to load it again. To assign a hot key to JAWS, do the following:
select the JAWS icon on your desktop. Press Alt+Enter to open shortcut properties, or do a right mouse click and open Properties from the context menu. Tab to the hot key field, and type the letter J. Now, tab to the Apply button and press the Spacebar, or click the Apply button with your mouse. Now, tab to the OK button, and press the Spacebar; or click the OK button with your mouse. After this, if you unload JAWS you can press Alt+Control+J to run it again.

Minimize All Applications and focus desktop: Press windows key+ m or press Windows+D. If you are in an application like Word, pressing Windows+D will take you to the Desktop. If you press Windows+D again, you will return to the application in which you were working; in this case, Microsoft Word.

Select a System Tray Icon Dialog:
Insert+F11. This opens the system tray, where you can change features that run automatically when you start Windows. Also, if Microsoft sends out new updates, you can install them from the System Tray.

Say system time:
Insert+F12. Speaks the current time.

Say system date:
Insert+ F12 pressed twice quickly. Speaks the current date.

JAWS find:
Control plus Insert plus f. This allows you to search for a text string on your screen using the JAWS cursor.

JAWS find next:
Insert plus f 3. Uses the JAWS cursor to search for the next occurrence of the text string on your screen.

Say top line of window:
Insert+end. Use Insert with the End key on your NumPad. End is the 1 key on the number pad. This keystroke reads the top line of the current window.

Read status line at bottom of Window:
Press Insert+NumPad 3. This reads the line with the page number if you are in Microsoft Word.

Check Cursor Position:
Press Alt+Numpad Delete, (gives vertical and horizontal position on screen in inches. This is very handy if you cannot see the screen, and want to know if pressing the Tab key moved you to the correct position. It can also be used to determine whether a heading is centered.

Read the Controls in a dialog box in tab order:
Insert+B. This command is used to read a dialog if it is not spoken, or if you need to hear it again. For example, if you are installing a program, pressing Insert+B will often read context that allows you to choose the correct input.

Virtualize the Current Window:
Press Alt+Insert+W. Copies the contents of the current window into a virtual buffer. You can then read through the text, or select it for copying to a Word document or Email message. This is very helpful if you need to send some one the contents of an error message.

Laptop Keystrokes. If you have a laptop, you can obtain training in use of laptop keystrokes as follows:
Open Internet Explorer and go to www.freedomscientific.com. Press Insert+F7 to list the links; then press the letter T followed by Enter to open the training page. Again, list the links and press T until you get to Training Downloads; then press Enter. List the links, then press the letter L until you get to Laptop Keystrokes with JAWS (MP3), then press Enter to open the Download dialog.
To download the file, Tab to the Save button and press Enter. If you are happy with your download location, press Tab until you reach the Download button and press Enter to download the file to your computer.

Word Commands for Moving Around Your Document.

These commands allow you to move around a document using the cursor keys and Shortcut Keys that are available in Microsoft Word. Shortcuts for saving your document are also given.

Move one character left:
Press Left Arrow key. Moves left one character and speaks it. Most people use the standard arrow keys with the Word commands, but the NumPad arrow keys will work as well.

Move one character right:
Press Right Arrow key. Moves right one character and speaks it.

Move to the start of the next word:
Press Control+Right Arrow. Moves right one word and speaks it. This is normally used when editing text. For example, suppose that you are using the Down Arrow key to proofread your document by moving down one line at a time. Assume that you hear JAWS say a word that doesn’t sound right. Press Control+Right Arrow to quickly move across the line one word at a time. You can then edit the word. When done, it is a good idea to press the Home key to move back to the left side of your screen. Continue using the Down Arrow key to move through your document one line at a time. If you hear another word that you need to correct, you know that pressing Control+Right Arrow will always locate the word that you want to correct.

Move to the start of the previous word:
Press Control+Left Arrow. Moves left one word at a time and speaks it. When editing, this command is used to move backward through your document one word at a time.

Move up one line:
Press Up Arrow. Moves up one line and speaks it.

Move down one line:
Press Down Arrow. Moves down one line and speaks it.

Move to the end of the current line:
Press End. Moves to the end of the current line. Suppose that, when proofreading a document, you hear an incorrect word that is near the end of the line. Just press the End key; then use Control+Left Arrow to move left word by word until you hear the word that must be corrected. When done, press the Home key to move to the beginning of the line, then continue pressing Down Arrow to proofread the document.

Move to the beginning of the current line:
Press Home. Moves your working cursor to the beginning of the current line.

Move one paragraph up:
Press Control+Up Arrow. Moves to the beginning of the prior paragraph and speaks it.

Move one paragraph down:
Press Control+Down Arrow. Moves down one paragraph and speaks it. This command is used most often to skim through a document.

Move up one screen of text:
Press Page Up. Moves you up through the document by one screen or 24 lines.

Move down one screen of text:
Press Page Down. Moves down through your document by 24 lines or one screen.

Move up one page:
Press Control+Page Up. Moves you up through the document by one page. This is usually about 54 lines, though the number of lines can change depending on your margin settings.

Move down one page:
Press Control+Page Down. This moves you down through a Word document one page at a time. Thus, if some one tells you that there is an error on page 7, you can use Control+Page Down to quickly locate page 7 of the document. If they tell you which paragraph the error is in, you can use Control+Down Arrow to quickly move to the paragraph where you need to make the correction.

Move to top of file:
Press Control+Home. Moves you quickly to the top of the current file. Most people use the Home key at the top middle position of the 6-pack above the arrow keys, but you can also use the Home key on the number pad. Thus, if you get to the bottom of a ten page document and want to read it again, just press Control+Home to jump to the top of your document.

Move to bottom of file:
Press Control+End. If you open a document on which you were previously working, just press Control+End (the key at the bottom middle of your 6-pack), to quickly jump to the bottom of your document where you can continue typing.

Delete one character to the left:
Press Backspace. Erases the last character that you typed, and speaks the character that was erased.

Delete one word to the left:
Press Control+Backspace. Deletes the last word that you typed and speaks the word as it is deleted.

Delete one character to the right:
Press Delete. Pressing the Delete key erases the character that your cursor was under, and it speaks the next character that will be erased if you press it again.

Delete one word to the right:
Press Control+Delete. Erases the word that your cursor was on, and speaks the next word that will be erased if you press Control+Delete again.

Saving Your Work in Word:

Save Current Document:
Press Control+S. If you have not saved the document before, the Save As dialog will open. Text from the top line of your document will be suggested as a file name. If you want another name, simply type the new name and press Enter to save the document. If you have already saved the document, pressing Control+S will quickly save any additional changes that you made to the document, without prompting you for another name. While typing a long document, it is a good idea to press Control+S from time to time to make sure that your current work is saved as you go.

Open Save As Dialog:
Press F12. If you have already saved a document, pressing F12 will open the Save As dialog so that you can save the document under another name, change the file type, or save the document in another location.

Commands for Selecting Text in Microsoft Word and Other Windows Applications.

These commands allow you to select text using the Word shortcut keys. You can then use Control+X or Control+V to cut and paste text into different locations. Or, you can select text and then press Control+D or Control+Shift+F to change its font. If you select text and then type something else, your new text will replace the text that was selected. Or, if you select text and then press the Delete key, the text that you selected will be deleted. If you want to bold text, select it first; then press Control+B.

Select one character to the right:
Press Shift+Right Arrow. Speaks the next character and the selection status.

Select one character to the left:
Press Shift+Left Arrow. Speaks the previous character and the selection status.

Select to end of current word:
Press Control+Shift+Right Arrow. Speaks the current word and selection status. If you keep pressing Control+Shift+Right Arrow, you will be selecting one word at a time.

Select to beginning of current word:
Press Control+Shift+Left Arrow. Speaks the current word and selection status. If you continue pressing Control+Shift+Left Arrow, you will be selecting words as you move to the left or backwards through your document.

Select from cursor to end of line:
Press Shift+End. This command selects text from your cursor position to the end of the current line. It speaks the word, "Selected," followed by the text that has been selected.

Select from cursor to beginning of line:
Press shift+Home. This command selects the text from your working cursor to the beginning of the current line. It speaks the word, "Selected," followed by the text that has been selected.

Select one line down:
Press Shift+Down Arrow. This command selects the line that you are on and speaks it. You can hold down the Shift key and continue pressing Down Arrow to select one line at a time. This command is often used to select text on the Internet. It can then be copied with Control+C, and then pasted into a document using Control+V, (see cut and past below).

Select one line up:
Press Shift+Up Arrow. Selects the current line. If you continue pressing Shift+Up Arrow, you will be able to select one line at a time as you move up or backward through your document.

Select to end of paragraph:
Press Control+Shift+Down Arrow. Selects to the end of your current paragraph. Hold down Control+Shift, and continue pressing Down Arrow to select one paragraph at a time as you move down through the document. This command thus allows you to select one paragraph at a time while moving down through the document.

Select to beginning of paragraph:
Press Control+Shift+Up Arrow. Selects to the beginning of the current paragraph. Allows you to select one paragraph at a time moving up through the document.

Select one screen down:
Press Shift+Page Down. Selects the current screen, (24 lines). If you continue to press Shift+Page Down, you will be selecting one screen at a time as you move down through the document.

Select one screen up:
Press Shift+Page Up. Selects the current screen, (24 lines). If you continue pressing Shift+Page Up, you will be selecting one screen at a time as you move up or backward through your document.

Select to end of document:
Press Control+Shift+End. Selects everything from your current cursor location to the end of the document. Application. This command is helpful if you have pasted a page from the internet into a Word document. In this case, there will be links and other material at the end of your file that you don't want. Move down to the beginning of the text that you want to delete. Press Control+Shift+End to select all of the text from your cursor to the end of the document; then press the Delete key to remove it.

Select to beginning of document:
Press Control+Shift+Home. Selects everything from the current cursor location to the beginning of the document. This is very handy if you have pasted text from the internet into a Word documents, and want to remove links and other material that appear at the beginning of the document. You can quickly select the text with Control+Shift+Home, and then press the Delete key to remove it.

Select entire document:
Press Control+A. Selects your entire document. For example, if you wanted to change your document from single to double space, Press Control+A to select the entire document. Then, press Control+2 to make the document double space. Then, press Right Arrow to deselect the text and move to the end of your document. Be careful with the control+A command. If you press any key other than an arrow key or a command key like Control+D to change the font, or Control+1, 2, or 5, to change the line spacing, after selecting your document, the entire document will be replaced by the character that you typed. If you do this inadvertently, press the undo command, (Control+Z), to undo the last keystroke. Continue pressing Control+Z until your document returns to the screen. Alternatively, press Alt+F4 followed by the letter N to close the document without saving the changes.

Say Selected Text:
Insert+Shift+Down Arrow. JAWS will speak the text that has been selected. This tells you if your selection worked.

Deselect text:
Press any Arrow key. This removes selection or highlighting from any text that has been selected.

Commands for Cut, Copy and Paste for Word and Other Windows Applications.

This section explains how to use Copy, Cut, Paste to copy or move text and graphics using shortcut keys.

xx zz Copy selected text or graphics to clipboard:
Press Control+C.

Cut selected text or graphics to clipboard:
Press Control+X.

Paste text or graphics to current location:
Press Control+V.

Open font dialog:
Press Control+Shift+F or Control+D.

Open Point Size dialog:
Press Control+Shift+P. Allows you to quickly change to another point size; for example, if you want to prepare a large print document. Suppose that you have a document in 12-point font, and some one needs to have it in 36-point font in order to see it. Press Control+A to select the document. Now, press Control+Shift+P for point size. Type 36 and then press Enter. Now, press Right Arrow to deselect the text and move to the end of your document. You can then press Control+P followed by Enter to print your large print document.

View list of spelling errors:
Press Alt+Shift+L. Brings up a list of spelling errors in your document. You can then press the Applications key or Shift+F10 to open a context menu for a particular word.

View list of grammatical errors:
Press Control+Shift+G.

Run Spell Checker:
Press F7. When a misspelled word is located, the misspelled word and the first suggested spelling will be spoken. You can press the Tab key to get to the list of suggestions; then arrow down to hear other suggestions. When you get to a suggestion that you want, you can continue to press the Tab key to get to buttons in the dialog that will replace the misspelled word with the selected suggestion, Ignore the word, (for example, a proper name), Change all occurrences of the word, Ignore all occurrences of the word, or add a word to your personal dictionary. Following are shortcuts that you can use in lieu of tabbing to the buttons.
Change word: Alt+C.
Change all occurrences of the word: Alt+L.
Ignore Word: Alt+I.
Ignore all occurrences of the Word: Alt+G.
Add word to your personal dictionary. Alt+A.

Close the active document:
Press Control+F4. Closes your document, but leaves Word open.

Switch between open documents:
Press Control+F6.

Insert page break:
Press Control+Enter.

Commands for Changing text attributes and Paragraph Format in MS Word.

Open Document Dialog:
Press Control+O. You can then type the name of the document and press Enter to open it. Or, press Shift+Tab to get to a list of files in your Documents or My Documents folder. Then, arrow down to the document you want to open and press Enter.

Apply or remove bold formatting:
Press Control+B. If text is selected, it will be bolded. If no text is selected, any text that you type will be bolded. If you use the second approach, be sure to press Control+B to turn off bolding when you get to the end of text that you want to be in bold format.

Apply or remove underline formatting:
Press Control+U.

Apply or remove Italic formatting:
Press Control+I.

Center text:
Press Control+E. Centers the text of the paragraph that you are in. Or, it centers text that has been selected. Is generally used to center headings.

Left align text:
Press Control+L.

Right align text:
Press Control+R.

Remove character formatting from selected text:
Press Control+Shift+Z. If you select text and then press Control+Shift+Z, formatting will be returned to the default. Thus, if you had a document in large 36-point font, you could press Control+A to select the entire document. Then, press Control+Shift+Z to return the document to its default format, (usually 12-point times new roman).

Indent paragraph from the left:
Press Control+M.

Remove a paragraph indent from the left:
Press Control+Shift+M.

Add hanging indent:
Press Control+T.

Remove hanging indent:
Press Control+Shift+T.

Say font and point size at cursor:
Insert+F.

Undo last action taken:
Press Control+Z.

Check line and column position:
Press Insert+Numpad Delete.

Check Page and Section number:
Press Insert+Numpad Page Down.

Use of Heading Styles in Microsoft Word

You can quickly apply heading styles as follows:

Heading level 1: Alt+1.
Heading level 2: Alt+2.
Heading Level 3: Alt+3.

Application. Suppose that you want your Introduction to have a heading 1 style which is bolded 16-point.

Make sure that the Word “Introduction” is on a line by itself.
Press Home to get to the beginning of the line.
Press Shift+End to select the line.
Press Control+Alt+1 to apply the heading level 1 style.

Quick Key Commands for Use with JAWS.

JAWS has a Quick Key command mode that can be very helpful if you have a document like this one with many headings.

Press Insert+Z to turn Quick Keys on. Press Insert+Z to turn Quick Keys off. When quick keys is turned on, the following commands work.

When quick keys is turned on, you cannot make any changes to the document. Thus, using Quick Keys is a good way to read a document safely, and it allows you to quickly move between pages, headings, paragraphs, and tables. Just press Insert+Z when you are done reviewing the document, and you are ready to begin typing again.

H: Moves to the next heading.
Shift+H: Moves to the previous heading.
T: Moves to the next table.
Shift+T: moves to the previous table.
Spacebar: Moves to the next page.
Backspace: Moves to the previous page.
P: Moves to the next paragraph.
Shift+P: Moves to the previous paragraph.

Use of the Virtual Ribbon Bar.

In JAWS12, you can easily navigate through the ribbon bars using the new JAWS Virtual Ribbon bar. When you first install JAWS and run the Startup Wizard, you can check a box that turns on the Virtual ribbon bar. When virtual ribbons are turned on, you can do the following in a program like Microsoft Word. Press the Alt key to get to the Virtual Ribbon bar. Use Right or Left Arrow to move through the choices on the top ribbon. When you get to a group that you want, press the Down Arrow to open it. When you come to a Submenu, press Right Arrow to open it, or Left Arrow to close it. You can use Up Arrow to move back up the tree after closing a submenu. Or, just press the Escape a couple of times to return to the top ribbon. Pressing the Escape key one more time will close the ribbon bar.

Turning the Virtual Ribbon Bar on and Off.

Press insert+V to open the JAWS Settings Manager in JAWS 12.
Press the letter V to get to the Virtual Ribbon option.
Press the Spacebar to toggle this option between on and off.
Press Enter to save your setting.

Materials from Freedom Scientific.

The following sections are included to demonstrate the many features that are included in the JAWS program. A training materials section, (ResearchIt), is included to illustrate the quality of the training materials that are available. Freedom Scientific has, as of this date, developed twenty-eight DAISY books that can be installed from the DVD when you purchase JAWS. There is no extra charge for these training materials, but many installers forget to install them. If they are not installed on your system, they can easily be installed from the DVD. Contact Freedom Scientific, Sweetman Systems, or your JAWS trainer if you need assistance in installing these excellent resources.

What's New in JAWS 12

This section was taken from the Freedom Scientific web page, (www.freedomscientific.com).

JAWS 12 Features
The following describes the new features available in JAWS 12.

JAWS BrailleIn™

The JAWS BrailleIn feature allows you to use only your Perkins-style Braille keyboard to control your computer using both Windows and application specific commands. In addition, you can also enter both contracted and uncontracted Braille input from your Braille display’s keyboard. The advantage is that you no longer have to switch between your computer’s keyboard and your display’s keyboard, or enter a special typing mode in order to use contracted Braille to run your computer or programs. Visit the Braille Display Input Commands Web page for a list of keystrokes that support Freedom Scientifics’ Focus Braille displays. For other Braille displays, contact the manufacturer for a list of keystrokes.

Typing with Contracted Braille
With BrailleIn, as you type in contracted Braille using the Perkins-style keyboard, your input is immediately translated back as normal text in the current e-mail, document, or form. If an application or specific edit box does not support contracted Braille, JAWS announces “Computer Braille” when tutor messages are enabled.

Contracted Braille input is off by default. To turn it on, do the following:

1.Press INSERT+F2, and select Settings Center.
2.In the Search edit box, type "Contracted Braille Translation" without the quotes.
3.Press DOWN ARROW to move to Contracted Braille Translation in the filtered search results in the tree view.
4.Next, press SPACEBAR to cycle through the different settings in the Contracted Braille Translation combo box. Available settings are Off, Output Only, and Input and Output. When set to Off, you cannot read or type in contracted Braille using your Braille display. When set to Output Only, you can read contracted Braille on your Braille display, but you can only type in computer Braille using the Perkins-style keyboard on your Braille display. When set to Input and Output, you can both read and type in contracted Braille using your Braille display. The default setting is Off.

Settings Center

JAWS Settings Center is a new feature that allows you to quickly configure and globally apply JAWS settings, or configure and apply settings for a specific application. It consolidates all options into one convenient dialog box. It includes a Search edit box, which provides an extremely fast way to find and edit JAWS functionality. Settings Center continues to use JCF files and is a direct replacement for Configuration Manager.

Settings Center consists of six primary areas described below. Press TAB or SHIFT+TAB to move through different parts of the dialog box.

•Application combo box: Select an application from the list to modify its settings for use with JAWS. To retrieve the JAWS default settings, press CTRL+SHIFT+D. To retrieve application settings, press SHIFT+TAB to move focus to the Application combo box. Next, select the application from the combo box, and then press TAB to move focus back to the tree view pane.

•Search edit box: Press CTRL+E to move focus to the Search box. Type a search word or phrase in the edit box to reduce the number of items that appear in the tree view list. Press DOWN ARROW to move to search results, and then press ENTER to move focus directly to that item in the tree view.

•Settings tree view pane: Use the tree view pane to select and change settings for the selected application. To retrieve the JAWS default settings, press CTRL+SHIFT+D. To retrieve application settings, press SHIFT+TAB twice to move focus to the Application combo box. Next, select the application from the combo box, and then press TAB to move focus back to the tree view pane. For a brief description of the item selected in the tree view, press TAB to move focus to the read-only edit box. Use the Say Line or Say All commands to read the help message. To vertically scroll through the tree view, use the UP and DOWN ARROW keys, PAGE UP and PAGE DOWN keys, or first letter navigation. Use the LEFT and RIGHT ARROW keys to expand or collapse tree view groups. Use the SPACEBAR to move through and change settings for each option.

•Configuration display pane: As you move through the tree view, a sighted user can simultaneously track cursor movement using the configuration display pane. Press F6 to switch between the tree view and this pane. This is necessary when typing in an edit or edit spin box.

•Help message pane: Displays context-sensitive help for the item currently selected in the tree view. Use the Say Line or Say All commands to read the help message.

•Apply, OK, and Cancel: Use Apply to make changes. Use OK to save changes and close Settings Center. Use Cancel to close Settings Center without saving changes. To use Settings Center, do the following:

1.Press INSERT+F2, and select Settings Center. Settings appear for the application that has focus. The cursor is in the Search edit box.

2.If you know the setting that you want to change, type a term for it in the edit box. For example, type the word "Braille" without the quotes for a filtered list of Braille settings. Next, press DOWN ARROW to move to the filtered results in the tree view.

Note: To load the default JAWS settings, press CTRL+SHIFT+D, and then search for the setting as previously described.

To select a different application, press SHIFT+TAB to move to the Application edit box. Use ARROW Keys or first letter navigation to select the application, and then press CTRL+E to search for the setting as previously described.

3.Press SPACEBAR to select check boxes, radio buttons, or other buttons, and press F6 to switch between an edit box and the tree view to change settings.

4.Choose Apply to apply changes and remain in Settings Center, OK to save changes and exit Settings Center, or Cancel to close Settings Center without saving changes. The new settings are saved to the appropriate JCF file.

Virtual Ribbon Menu

The Ribbon is a new style of menu available in many new applications being released today. Ribbons first appeared in Office 2007 programs, but are now becoming more common in other applications tailored for the Windows 7 operating system. Ribbons create an accessibility challenge due to inconsistent navigation between various groups and items. For example, when you enter the Lower Ribbon and press the ARROW keys to move between items in a group, you can skip items and unexpectedly move into another group. Pressing TAB gives no indication that you have left one group and entered another. Using first letter navigation to find items can be difficult and frustrating. Finally, because of a group’s layout, you do not know if you should navigate up, down, left, or right to select an item.

The new Virtual Ribbon Menu provides predictable navigation, lets you see everything in the Ribbon, and offers consistency when navigating with ARROW keys. For example, the ARROW and TAB keys move focus from the Upper Ribbon tabs to the Lower Ribbon groups. Once in a group, the ARROW, TAB, and SHIFT+TAB keys move through all items in a group, move from one group to the next, and wrap to the beginning of the Ribbon. For submenus, SPACEBAR and ENTER expands menus, and ESC collapses menus. The Virtual Ribbon Menu is off by default and can be switched on or off from within Settings Center or the JAWS Startup Wizard. When the Virtual Ribbon Menu is on, the Ribbon is navigated using a traditional menu and submenu format familiar to most JAWS users.

Marking and Returning to a Place in Word

Word uses bookmarks to let you mark and later find locations in a document. However, this also means that you are editing and changing the document. Using the new PlaceMarker feature in Word, you can now mark a location without affecting the document. It allows you to easily return to the PlaceMarker any time, even after closing Word or rebooting your computer. There is no need to remember that location or use Navigation Quick Keys or a dialog to find it, as you would a bookmark. Also, if you share the document with others, the marker will not be available to them. Press CTRL+WINDOWS Key+K to set or move the marker. Only one PlaceMarker can be set per document. Press WINDOWS Key+K to return to the marked location.

This feature also makes it easy to select large blocks of text. Just mark a starting point in the document, read and navigate until you reach the end of the text that you want to select, and then press INSERT+SPACEBAR, M. This acts the same way as clicking and dragging a mouse over text. Once selected, feel free to copy, cut, or paste the text anywhere you like.

Text Analyzer

When editing a document using speech only, inconsistencies such as unmatched parentheses, unintentional format changes, extra whitespace, and stray or unspaced punctuation can often be missed. The new Text Analyzer feature is a tool that notifies you of these errors in your document by using a spoken message or WAV file. You can configure JAWS to announce discrepancies by count, by description, or by sound while proofreading the document by line, sentence, paragraph, or Say All command. Braille users will benefit from this since a sound can be emitted before the user has time to read the entire line looking for errors.

Text Analyzer is off by default. To turn it on, do one of the following:

•Use the new layered keystroke, INSERT+SPACEBAR, T. By pressing and releasing INSERT+SPACEBAR, and then pressing T, the Text Analyzer can be switched on or off.

•Open Settings Center (INSERT+F2). In the Search edit box type "Text Analyzer" without the quotes, and then press SPACEBAR to select an alert notification.

•Use the Adjust JAWS Options dialog box (INSERT+V) to select Text Analyzer, and then select the type of alert notification to use. If multiple issues are identified in the document, press ALT+WINDOWS Key+I to move to the next item, or ALT+SHIFT+WINDOWS Key+I to move to the previous item. Note that these keystrokes can still be used even if Text Analyzer is off.

Automatic Notification of Updates

When JAWS starts, it can now alert you if a software update is available. You then have the option to install it now or later. This is known as Automatic Notification of Updates and is on by default.

If you decide not to install the JAWS update now, you can always manually check for updates using the update feature in the JAWS Help menu. To turn auto notification on or off, choose Basics in the JAWS Options menu, and select or clear the Automatic Notification of Updates check box.

Say All Schemes

Continuous reading of a Web page or Word document with numerous links can be frustrating due to constant interruptions that identify links and headings on the page. An example of this is when you read a Wikipedia article using the Say All command, where many words in the article are links to other articles. The Say All Scheme feature can alleviate this annoyance by using an unobtrusive sound or no link and heading indication at all to provide a smooth reading experience when using the Say All command.

Say All Schemes is located in the Say All group in Settings Center. Select No Change to continue using the current speech and sounds scheme in use. Select Say All Text with Sounds to hear a subtle WAV file sound, such as a Ding, when JAWS reads a link or heading. Select Say All Text Only to ignore HTML elements like links and headings. You can also use Add/Remove, which is a button in the Say All group, to add and use other schemes for Say All Reading.

Reverse Panning Buttons for Braille

Reverse Panning Buttons is a new feature that allows you to switch the direction of left and right panning buttons. This is a great benefit if you are a two-handed Braille user who reads different parts of a Braille line at the same time. By the time your right hand reaches the end of the display, your left hand can be back at the left side of the display ready to advance it. This can significantly increase Braille reading and is ideal for Braille power users.

To use reverse panning, do the following:

1.Press INSERT+F2 and select Settings Center.
2.In the Search edit box, type "Reverse Panning Buttons" without the quotes.
3.Press DOWN ARROW to move to Reverse Panning Buttons in the filtered search results in the tree view.
4.Press SPACEBAR to select the Reverse Panning Buttons check box.
5.Press TAB to move to the OK button, and then SPACEBAR to save the change and close Settings Center.

JAWS is now configured so that when you press a left Navrow button or Panning key, panning advances to the right. Likewise, when you press a right Navrow button or Panning button, panning advances to the left. To restore normal panning operation, repeat this procedure and clear the Reverse Panning Buttons check box.

Hotkey Component for Structured Braille Support

When using Structured Mode, you can configure the amount of information and the order in which the information appears on the Braille display when navigating the controls in a dialog box, an Office Ribbon, or a spreadsheet. Component information includes a control’s name, state, type, and so on. Using the Define Structured Mode feature, you can now determine if hotkeys are included in the descriptive details and the placement of this information on the Braille display. This provides several benefits. For familiar or less complex application, you can turn off hotkey information, which will save valuable space on a small Braille display. For complex applications, you can turn on hotkey information and change its relative position on the Braille display so that it immediately appears after the name of the control. The hotkey component is turned off by default.

To turn on the hotkey component and change its position, do the following:


1.Press INSERT+F2, and select Settings Center.
2.In the Search edit box, type "Define Structured Mode" without the quotes.
3.Press DOWN ARROW to move to Define Structured Mode in the filtered search results in the tree view.
4.Press SPACEBAR to choose the button and open the Control Type Options dialog box. Focus is in the Control Properties page.
5.Select a control from the Control Properties list, and then choose Modify Control.
6.In the Available To list, select Hotkey and add it to the Show On list. Use the Up or Down buttons to change its position in the list.
7.Choose OK to close this dialog box, and OK again to close the Control Type Options dialog box.
8.Press TAB to move to the OK button, and then SPACEBAR to save and close Settings Center.

Note: To turn off the hotkey component, select Hotkey from the Show On list, and choose the Remove button.

JAWS Support for ARIA

ARIA (Accessible Rich Internet Applications) is assistive technology markup used by Web content creators to make Web pages more accessible for screen readers. This is done by adding specific ARIA tags and elements to HTML code. Visit the Freedom Scientific Screen Reading Software Documentation Web page, and read the JAWS Support for ARIA document to learn more about JAWS and ARIA markup.

Reading HTML Tables

The default setting for reading HTML table titles has changed so that JAWS now conforms to industry defined HTML standards by only reading table headers that are properly marked up. You can see this when using the CTRL+ALT+ARROW Keys to move through an HTML table.

While the default setting is now set to Only Marked Headers, you can continue to use earlier functionality for reading HTML tables if you are more comfortable with those settings. To change settings, press INSERT+V to open JAWS options, and then press T to move to the Table Titles Announce option. Next, press SPACEBAR to cycle through and select a new setting, and then ENTER to save the change.

Remember that you can always use Personalized Settings (INSERT+SHIFT+V) to customize how JAWS reads table column and row headers on any given Web site, without modifying how JAWS reads table headers on other Web sites.

For more information about reading HTML tables, visit the Tables section of Freedom Scientifics’ Surf’s Up.

Research It Enhancements

NCAA Football is a new addition to Research It. Use it to search for the schedules or results of your favorite college football teams. Because of the number of college teams, there are several ways to get search results.

One way is to open Research It (INSERT+SPACEBAR, R), type a date using the mm/dd/yyyy date format, and then select NCAA Football. This shows a full list of games scheduled or played during that week. Another is to leave the search field blank and see schedules or results for the current week. The last way is to search for your favorite college teams by typing team names separated by a semicolon. This shows the current week’s schedules or results for those schools. For example, type Florida; Texas; California to view results for teams with Florida, Texas, or California in their names.

Search results display in the Virtual Viewer as a link so that you can open a Web browser and read a recap of past games or a preview of future games. Press CTRL+DOWN ARROW to move between the dates displayed for the week.

Updates have also been made to the MLB, NBA, NFL, and NHL lookup sources in Research It. These have been expanded and now provide links to box scores and game summaries. Each game listed in the Virtual Viewer is now a link. Select any link to launch your Web browser and read a recap and statistics of past games, or a preview of future games. In addition, the MLB Scores lookup source has been revised to list all baseball games together instead of grouping separately into American and National leagues.

Improvements with Adobe Flash

JAWS can now announce buttons and other items that did not work correctly on some Flash Web sites while using Internet Explorer. Examples of Web sites that now function properly are Audible.com and Dominos.ca.

Improvements with My Computer in Windows 7

When using My Computer in Windows 7, JAWS not only announces the drive letter and volume label, but now also includes both used and free space on the drive, as well as the percentage of free space. While this information is readily available to sighted users, JAWS now makes it accessible to all users. To open My Computer, press WINDOWS Key+E.

Keyboard Lock

The Keyboard Lock feature is useful when you want to prevent accidental keyboard action. A typical example for locking the keyboard would be when you are transferring files across a network or when a download is in progress. This feature will prevent file transfer or download cancellation if you accidentally press a key. Keyboard Lock is also ideal for JAWS Tandem sessions where it can prevent inadvertent keyboard activity on the target-side computer.

While the keyboard is locked, you can still run JAWS reading commands like Say Line, Say Window Title, and Say Word. For example, you can position the JAWS cursor at a specific location on the screen, and then use the Say Line command to monitor that location while the keyboard is locked. Also, the invisible cursor and the Braille cursor can roam the screen without moving the active cursor.

To switch Keyboard Lock on and off, press INSERT+SPACEBAR, L. Although this feature locks the keyboard and Braille display, it does not affect mouse activity.

Downloading and Installing JAWS 12.

The following briefly describes how to download, save, and install the JAWS 12 release.

Note: If your corporate firewall prevents you from downloading files using FTP (File Transfer Protocol), use the HTTP (Hypertext Transfer Protocol) links instead.

1.Select the appropriate download link that appears at the end of this procedure.
2.When the dialog box opens, choose Save and select a location where you can easily find the downloaded executable file.
3.Run the executable and follow the talking installer.
4.After installing software, always check for updates to make sure you have the latest release.

Using the JAWS Search It Feature:

With JAWS 11, Freedom Scientific included an incredible Search feature which was improved even more in JAWS 12. I will demonstrate its power by giving a few examples.

Press Insert+Spacebar to enter JAWS command mode.
Press the letter R for Research it.
Press Tab to get to the list of items that you can search.
Press the letter R to select the Reuters news choice.
Press the Enter key.

Within a few seconds, a page will be displayed showing the top news stories. Press Insert+Down Arrow to read the page. You can press Enter on the link that is at the end of each summary to go to the full story on the Internet.

If this interests you, read on. Following is the summary that comes with the JAWS training materials that you can install with JAWS11 or JAWS12. There are more choices in JAWS12, and any links that stopped working in prior versions were fixed in JAWS 12.

Research It Instructions From JAWS Training Materials.

Copyright© 2010 Freedom Scientific, Inc., all rights reserved.

Studies have been done that measure eye tracking on Web pages.
Cameras and infrared emitters are used to map the areas of Web pages that most people look at when scanning them visually.
These studies show how much time users spend looking at different parts of a Web page.
Most users quickly tune out banners, advertisements, and other clutter on Web pages and focus in right away on the information they need.
Often they look at pictures instead of text links.
For example, a weather page might have a three day forecast represented by a picture of the sun, clouds, clouds and rain, and so on.
This information is often buried in the middle of the page, and sighted users flick their eyes quickly to the information they are looking for.
But what if you cannot see the page?
Screen reader users, for example, must often read through text and banner links, advertisements, and much more before finding the information they are looking for.
That's where Research It from Freedom Scientific comes in!

Research It, included with JAWS® screen reading software, is a versatile tool that provides quick access to data while also making it easy to return to your primary task.
If you have JAWS 11 or later (whether you are using the full version or a demo version) and an Internet connection, you can begin using Research It.
It uses a lookup source to find information and then posts it in the Virtual Viewer.
Some examples of things you can look up quickly with Research It include:

  • Dictionary definitions using Wiktionary
  • Amazon product search
  • Bookshare book search
  • Yellow pages (business) or white pages (people) search
  • Health search on WebMD
  • Weather forecasts
  • Top news stories
  • Sports scores and game listings
  • Stock prices
  • Encyclopedia articles
  • Area codes and time zones
  • And many other things

Using just a few keystrokes, you can start Research It from any application on your computer.
In addition, you can easily set which lookup module to use as the default for all applications.
In this book we will examine some of the basic lookup sources included with JAWS.
We will also explore the different ways to launch and use Research It.

NOTE:

Some of the Research It lookups are for customers who live in North America only, while others are helpful for JAWS users worldwide. However, Research It has been developed in such a way that others, not only the folks at Freedom Scientific, can develop their own lookups. Read more about this in the section below for the Research It Developer's Guide.

Starting Research It

You can start Research It with any of the following methods:

Press INSERT+SPACEBAR followed by the letter R.

This opens the Research It dialog box.

Once it opens you can then type a word or phrase for something you want to research and then press TAB to move to a list of different lookup sources to perform your search with.

When you use this keystroke, first press and release INSERT+SPACEBAR, and then press R.

Press INSERT+WINDOWS Key+R to launch Research It and JAWS uses the primary lookup source.

By default, Wiktionary is the primary lookup source.
This means that while the cursor is on a word in a document or on a Web page, you can press this keystroke and quickly lookup the Wiktionary definition for that word.

Press INSERT+F2 to open the list of JAWS managers, and then choose Research It in the list.

The New Research It Dialog Box

The Research It dialog box was changed beginning with JAWS 11 Update 1 to make it easier to use.

Let's explore it by pressing the TAB key.

First, press INSERT+SPACEBAR followed by the letter R to open the Research It dialog box if you don't already have it open.

Focus is in the edit box where you can type in a search word or phrase.
If you had previously typed in something here you would find that last item still here.
This is an edit combo box, and JAWS keeps a history here of the last 20 items you searched for.

Press TAB to move to the next control.

This is the list of lookups and I'm sure this list will change over time so don't be surprised if you hear something different on your computer than what you hear on mine.
The list is alphabetical, with one exception.
The primary lookup you choose is always going to appear at the top of the list.
By default, that's Wiktionary.

Press HOME to move to the top of this list if needed to verify that Wiktionary is there.

Press CTRL+P to pause the narrated audio for a minute and spend a minute looking at some of the other lookups available to you.

Editor’s note. The JAWS text/audio training materials are available only if you have installed the JAWS training materials using the Startup wizard. If JAWS is already installed on your computer, you can find the Setup Wizard in JAWS Help which is accessed from the JAWS Window or the JAWS context menu if JAWS is in your system tray.

When you're ready to resume listening to the audio, press CTRL+P again.

Press TAB to move to the next control. This is a read-only text area that contains a description of the current lookup.
Read through this by pressing the arrow keys.

Press TAB to move to the next control. There's the OK button. And again. The Cancel button.

Press TAB to move to the next control. Here's a check box for maintaining the word or phrase history.

If you don't want JAWS to keep track of what you type here, uncheck this by pressing SPACEBAR on it.

If you've never typed any lookup word, or if you have cleared the history, there are two buttons that are unavailable.
In a minute I'm going to press TAB one more time to get back to the edit box and type a word or phrase. Then I'll demonstrate those other two buttons.
The first one is the Clear History Item, and the second one is the Clear All History Items.
Let's talk about the Options button for a minute, though.

You activate the Options button when you want to change the primary lookup.
You can also use the Options button to prevent lookups from showing up in the list.
For example, I may want to make the Area Code my primary lookup and remove some of the lookups that I may never personally use.
I'll discuss this later in more detail in the section on Changing the Primary Lookup Source.

Go ahead and press TAB and move to the Word or Phrase edit field. I'll type in some text here. And I'll press ENTER to look up the definition of "today." There it is. I'll press ESC .
The Research It dialog box has closed, and what I'm going to do now is reopen it and look at those other two buttons.

INSERT+SPACEBAR, and the letter R.
And I'll just press SHIFT+TAB to go backwards.
There's the Options button.
Notice that the access key is the letter P, so you can press ALT+P to access it a lot faster.

I'll press SHIFT+TAB again. And again.
So after the Maintain Word or Phrase History check box you find the Clear History Item.

Pressing SPACEBAR on this button clears the current word or phrase from the edit combo box above.
I'll go ahead and TAB forward again.

Next is the Clear All History Items button.
Pressing SPACEBAR on this button clears the entire history of words or phrases from the edit combo box above.

For now, go ahead and press ESC to close the Research It dialog box.

Research It Examples

Let's take a look at a few examples of how you might use Research It.

Wiktionary

Imagine that you are reading this document using FSReader and you come across an unfamiliar word. With Wiktionary set as your primary lookup source, you can do the following:

While the cursor is on that word, press INSERT+WINDOWS Key+R to launch Research It.

After a few seconds, the JAWS Virtual Viewer window opens and displays a Wiktionary-based description of the word.

With the Virtual Viewer open, you can also select and copy the information to the Windows clipboard.
You can also use normal reading keys to review the text in the Virtual Viewer.

After reading the description, press ESC to close the Virtual Viewer, and JAWS returns to the cursor location in the document.

EXERCISE:

Look up the following word along with the instructor:

Put the cursor in the word kiwi in this sentence and press INSERT+WINDOWS Key+R.
There's the Virtual Viewer.
I'll press the SayAll, INSERT+DOWN ARROW, keystroke to read through this text.

When you're finished reading the text, press ESC to close the Virtual Viewer.
Notice that the cursor is back on the word kiwi in the document.
I'll press the SayWord keystroke,
INSERT+NUM PAD 5, now to confirm this.
And there it is.

Business Search

Use the Business Search lookup source (similar to looking in the yellow pages) to find a business in your area. Search results will provide the name, address, and phone number.

EXERCISE:

Let's look up a pizza place nearby.

Press INSERT+SPACEBAR and then R to open the Research It dialog box.

Type in Pizza Hut, followed by a semicolon, and then the zip code 33716 (or substitute your own zip code during this exercise).
You could also type in a city, or a city and state for the location instead of using the zip code.

Then press TAB to move to the list of lookups.
I'll choose Business Search and press ENTER.

The Virtual Viewer opens with a list of Pizza Huts in my zip code area.
I'll read through a couple of them.
Next, I'll press ESC to close the Virtual Viewer.

Weather

Use the Weather lookup resource to receive the current weather forecast for any location based on city name, airport code, or zip code.

EXERCISE:

Let's look up the weather in Melbourne, Australia.

Press INSERT+SPACEBAR and then R to open the Research It dialog box.

Type in Melbourne, Australia, and then press TAB to move to the list of lookups.
Notice that focus is still on the last item in the list that you researched, Business Search.
This is great because if you need to use the same lookup, JAWS remembers the last one you used, even if you shut down the computer and start again later.

Use the UP and DOWN ARROWS or first letter navigation to select Weather and then press ENTER.
The Virtual Viewer opens with the current weather for Melbourne.

I'll press DOWN ARROW to read a few lines of this.

OK, looks nice there.
I believe at the time of this recording it is the end of summer there.

I'll press ESC to close the Virtual Viewer.

Pause the FSReader audio with CTRL+P and try this on your own with a zip code, a local airport code, or city and country.

When you're ready to continue, press CTRL+P again to play the audio and follow along.

Reuters Top News Stories

What if you want to look up the latest news?
Follow along using the steps below:

EXERCISE:

Press INSERT+SPACEBAR and then R to open the Research It dialog box.

I'm going to delete the text that I last typed here.
It's already selected, so I'll just press the BACKSPACE key to delete it.

Press TAB to move to the list of lookups.

Choose Reuters Top News Stories in the list and press ENTER.
After a few seconds the Virtual Viewer has opened with a list of top news stories.
I'll press DOWN ARROW to move through a couple of them.

Notice that there is a short description and then a link to the main article.
If you want to read more about a particular item, just press ENTER on the link and you'll be connected to a Web page for that article.

For now, I'm just going to press ESC to close the Virtual Viewer.

National Hockey League Scores (NHL)

Let's look up some NHL scores next.
You can also do this for several other sports.

EXERCISE:

Press INSERT+SPACEBAR and then R to open the Research It dialog box.

I'll press BACKSPACE to erase that text that is there.
I'm not going to type anything in the edit box.

I'll press TAB to move to the list of lookups and look for NHL Scores.
There it is.
I'll press ENTER .

The Virtual Viewer may open with scores from either yesterday's game or today's games that have not yet been played.
In my case, the Virtual Viewer has opened up with the game times for later this evening.

I'll press DOWN ARROW and read a few lines of this.

If you want to find out the game times for the future, you can type the date in the edit box before choosing a given sport in the lookup list.
Great!
OK, for now I'll press ESC to close the Virtual Viewer.

Changing the Primary Lookup Source

To assign a different lookup source as the default lookup for Research It do the following:

Press INSERT+SPACEBAR followed by the letter R to open the Research It dialog box.

Press ALT+P to activate the Options button.
The Research It Options dialog box opens.
It consists of the following parts:

Where the focus is, is a list of the different lookups available, with a check box next to each one.
Unchecking the check box next to an item in this list keeps it from showing up in the main Research It list.
It does not delete the lookup, so you can always check it again later if you decide you want to see that lookup again in the list of lookups.

I'll TAB.

Next is the Set Primary button.
Activate this button to change the default lookup.
For example, I'm going to change mine to Area Code in a minute so I can demonstrate this for you.
For now let's continue exploring this dialog box.

Next is the Description button.
Activate this button to read a description of the lookup that is currently selected in the list.
Then there are the OK and Cancel buttons.

For now I'm going to press TAB to move back to the list of lookups.
There it is.

I'll find Area Code in the list.
To set this as my primary lookup I'll press ALT+S to activate the Set Primary button.
I heard that Area Code is now my primary lookup.
I'll press the SayLine keystroke, INSERT+UP ARROW, to repeat that.

The default button is the OK button. I can tell that by pressing INSERT+E.
So I can just press ENTER to close the Research It Options dialog box.
I'll do that now.
The Research It Options dialog box has closed.

Let's say that I want to look up an area code before I return a phone call to a customer.
I'll look up area code 408.
I'll put the cursor in the number and press INSERT+WINDOWS Key+R.
Remember, that keystroke performs the Research It lookup that is the current default.

Currently, I don't have anything running so I'll just start Notepad and type 408.
And there it is.
I'll read this using the arrow keys.
I'll press ESC to close the virtual viewer.
Try this on your own.

Research It Developer's Guide

If you are a software developer or script developer, you can create and customize your own lookup module and tailor it to your organization's needs. A law office or medical office can have a search engine for legal and medical terms, while a school or government agency can have a lookup module dedicated to specific acronyms and terminology.

A developer's guide that outlines formatting for rule sets and debugging techniques is available at http://www.freedomscientific.com/downloads/JAWS/ResearchItGuide.asp.

Also, visit the e-learning page of the Freedom Scientific Training Department,
http://www.FreedomScientific.com/elearn
to find the archive of the Research It webinar that was held recently.

Conclusion

I think you will really enjoy using Research It!
Don't forget to try using some of the other lookup tools, and also don't forget that people following the directions in the Research It Developer's Guide can create their own lookups as well.